Projects and Presentations


Title: Cognitive Radio Characterization to enable Malware Detection

Students: Laci Sears and Hannah Bowers

Mentor: Dr. Yaling Yang

Project Abstract: Cognitive Radio (CR) is an intelligent radio technology that can learn from and adapt to its environment. Its flexibility enables it to opportunistically access spectrum white space over a large spectrum range and hence enables the development of Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) networks. Its huge potential in significantly boosting spectrum utilization makes it likely to be widespread in the near future. Since Cognitive Radio is a new and growing technology, measures need to be taken to protect and secure each system. As CR becomes more popular, the demand for malware detection will increase. The purpose of this project is to lay the fore ground for designing an effective CR malware detection system based on dependency and correlation among CR component events. This solution is based on the observation that a normal-operating CR exhibits strong causal dependencies and correlations among its operational events. A CR that is infected by malware, however, is unlikely to exhibit similar relation. Our solution will monitor the CR operation events at multiple levels, including radio hardware and software, operating system, user application, and network levels. It will compare the event traces with the event correlation and dependency profile of normal CR operation and detect malware through the discovered discrepancy. We will achieve this goal using the Perl Scripting Language, GNU Radio, and the Linux System using Ubuntu.

Laci and Hannah at the Symposium

Poster

Presentation

Final Report

 


Project Title: Wireless Network Location Verification

Students: Samuel Walker and Wosen Agedie

Mentor: Dr. Louis Beex

Project Abstract: There are many localization techniques used in a wide variety of applications. GPS is the primary application of outdoor localization. However, GPS has short comings when trying to locate a transmitter inside of a building. This paper aims to present a model that can verify where a transmitter is located indoors by using a building-wide wireless network. Indoor location verification can be useful to emergency personnel when locating an individual who is in a life threatening situation. We experimented on the Cognitive Radio Network Testbed (CORNET), and came up with a model that can enable us to determine on which floor a transmitter is found and where on that floor the transmitter is found. By using the signal strength on arrival method in order to obtain data, we found the minimum optimal number of nodes necessary to receive reliable results.

presenting at the symposium

Poster

Presentation

Final Report


Project Title: An Experimental Demonstration of Dynamic Spectrum Access System

Students: Amos Ajo and Samuel Henderson

Mentors: Dr. Louis Beex and Dr. Carl Dietrich

 Project Abstract: As wireless technology devices continue to be used and developed at a staggering rate, the challenge of addressing access to the limited frequency spectrum in wireless communication continues to evolve. Software Defined Radios (SDR) and Cognitive Radios (CR) are some of the promising new technologies aimed at addressing spectrum access issues faced by wireless service providers and consumers. This paper will demonstrate a Dynamic Spectrum Access System (DSA) where a cognitive Secondary User (SU) link will access a frequency channel which it shares with a primary user (PU) link, ensuring only that it operates without interfering the PU link transmissions. Moreover, the paper shows the results of an experiment using Matlab, GNU radio software and computer sound cards to implement a working model of a Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) transmitter/receiver PU link, and Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) transmitter/receiver SU link. In the experiment the SU is allowed to Access the PU spectrum by sensing the burst and inter-burst times of transmission for the PU, dynamically accessing the allotted channel of the spectrum such that it incurs minimal interference on the transmission of the PU.

Amos and Sam at the symposium

Poster

Presentation

Final Report


Project Title: Waveform Development using REDHAWK IDE

Students: Cecilia Chen and Natasha Hatton

Mentors: Dr. Steve Edwards and Dr. Carl Dietrich

 Project Abstract: REDHAWK is new, open source software based on the Software Communications Architecture (SCA) 2.2.2 designed to create applications to simplify the rapid development of real-time Software Defined Radio (SDR) and systems. The REDHAWK Integrated Development Environment (IDE), based on Eclipse, provides a complete environment for all aspects of SDR development including: source code generation, graphical drag-and-drop waveform construction, runtime introspection of systems, integration with debuggers, and advanced signal visualization (Erik Englund, 2013). Waveform applications that use the RTL 2832-based SDR were developed and tested using custom and available REDHAWK signal processing components. Although initial REDHAWK documentation has been released, it is still under development; therefore, processes were documented and shared to broaden the community of users through YouTube tutorials and written documentation.

 

Natasha and Cecilia present at the symposium

Poster

Presentation

Final Report


Project Title:

Sampling Mixer for Software Defined Radio Applications in 0.18um CMOS Technology

Students: Matthew Davis and Chris Davis

Mentors: Dr. K-J Koh and Hedieh Elyasi, Ph.D. Student

 Project Abstract: A major aspect of cognitive radio (CR) includes the ability to dynamically adjust transmission frequency due to various changes in a devices operating environment. The basis of CR is built upon software-defined radio (SDR) technology. Sampling mixers provide the potential to move analog-to-digital converters (ADC) closer to the antenna input; a major goal to achieve low power consumption and low cost in software defined radio devices. Also, it is easy to reconfigure sampling mixers characteristics by adjusting capacitance ratios and clock frequencies. In this project, a sampling mixer has been designed, simulated, and analyzed using 0.18 um CMOS technology to meet frequency-adaptive carrier demodulation demands. Proposed sampling mixer simulation results regarding noise figure (NF), conversion gain, 1-dB compression point (P-1dB), third order input intercept point (IIP3) and power consumption are discussed.

Matt and Chris present at symposium

Poster

Presentation

Final Report